Jordan from 1870 to 1916

1870

the worldwide introduction of the rubber comb.

Jordan was unwilling to invest in the means of mass production needed to compete in the comb sector and manufacturing ceased in 1886.

1902

The company was converted into a family corporation – A/S W. Jordan Børste & Penselfabrik.

1910

Jordan established a pension fund financed entirely by corporate profits, an unusual innovation at that time.

Jordan, compared to conditions elsewhere at that time, was seen as a good place to work. Staff were well looked after and co-operation between the workforce and managers was excellent. Strikes were very rare and once hired staff tended to stay for many years; 60 years of continuous service was not unknown. Jordan as a company was also something of a social pioneer.

1911

Fredrik William Jordan died aged 70 years. That same year, his son, Hjalmar Jordan (born 10 April 1887), joined the business.

He maintained a close eye on the developments made by his foreign competitors and investigated new methods of streamlining production. Subsequent investment in modern machinery and equipment improved corporate competitiveness and spurred further growth.

1914

The start of World War I brought a shortage of raw materials.

Through his foresight as an experienced and substantial importer Jordan ensured that the warehouses were so well stocked that they maintained production without interruption throughout the war years.

1916

Jordan changed its address.

The premises in Skippergaten had become too small and so the business moved into Waldemar Thranesgate 75, close to the town´s river. This provided opportunities to further streamline production, as well as introducing central heating. The innovation of an internal elevator also provided a new means of efficient internal transport.

1870

the worldwide introduction of the rubber comb.

Jordan was unwilling to invest in the means of mass production needed to compete in the comb sector and manufacturing ceased in 1886.

1902

The company was converted into a family corporation – A/S W. Jordan Børste & Penselfabrik.

1910

Jordan established a pension fund financed entirely by corporate profits, an unusual innovation at that time.

Jordan, compared to conditions elsewhere at that time, was seen as a good place to work. Staff were well looked after and co-operation between the workforce and managers was excellent. Strikes were very rare and once hired staff tended to stay for many years; 60 years of continuous service was not unknown. Jordan as a company was also something of a social pioneer.

1911

Fredrik William Jordan died aged 70 years. That same year, his son, Hjalmar Jordan (born 10 April 1887), joined the business.

He maintained a close eye on the developments made by his foreign competitors and investigated new methods of streamlining production. Subsequent investment in modern machinery and equipment improved corporate competitiveness and spurred further growth.

1914

The start of World War I brought a shortage of raw materials.

Through his foresight as an experienced and substantial importer Jordan ensured that the warehouses were so well stocked that they maintained production without interruption throughout the war years.

1916

Jordan changed its address.

The premises in Skippergaten had become too small and so the business moved into Waldemar Thranesgate 75, close to the town´s river. This provided opportunities to further streamline production, as well as introducing central heating. The innovation of an internal elevator also provided a new means of efficient internal transport.