Jordan from 1920 to 1945

1920

“We brush the whole country”

This was a slogan that Jordan introduced at the beginning of the 1920s, and at that time the company marketers had good reason for the claim. By then Jordan brushes could be found right across the country. Even in the remotest village it was possible to buy the company’s brooms and brushes.

1927-1933

Production and marketing of toothbrushes from 1927

In a far-reaching move Jordan introduced toothbrushes to its already wide range of brush products in 1927. This was brought about by Hjalmar Jordan, the founder’s grandson and former CEO, and brought a whole new dimension to the business. It came about as a result of his widespread travels abroad where he observed the large production of toothbrushes and realized the enormous potential that this represented. From that point Hjalmar Jordan set about transforming the company in his usual purposeful and systematic way. Technically, it was a very complicated task, and the first models were only introduced after a succession of long-term experiments and favourable test results. With the product perfected, the company secured a site at Sinsen/Løren and built the country’s first toothbrush plant, with production getting underway in 1933. Soon Jordan was supplying over half of the toothbrush market in Norway. With the production equipment purchased abroad the quality of the products was considered to be almost on a par with the foreign competition.

1930

The first prosthesis brushes also came on the market in the early 1930s. At this time celluloid also began to make inroads and Jordan decided to resume production of combs.

1936

Having had great success with their toothbrushes in the domestic market in 1936 the company made its first foray into exports, establishing a commission warehouse in Sweden for toothbrushes, vulcanised brushes and some fine brushes.

1937

Centenary Year

1937 saw Jordan celebrate its 100th anniversary, and at the same time it was developing into a substantial business, producing 225,000 toothbrushes that year. Turnover in 1937 was NOK 1.3 million and the company employed 144 people.

1938

The 17th of June 1938 saw the early death of Hjalmar Jordan aged just 51 years. He was later honoured by having a road named after him in Oslo.

1940-1945

War Years

Just before the outbreak of World War II Jordan expanded production and purchased the first moulding machinery in Norway. During the war, the machine produced combs and afterwards it was used to manufacture toothbrush handles in plastic, representing a major advance in the technical capabilities of the company’s manufacturing base. The war left its mark on the business. New production equipment was unavailable and like everyone else the company had to do its best with obsolete machinery. It was also important to keep the workforce together, as the loss of key employees could create serious problems, particularly as Jordan was the only company of its kind in the country, which made it difficult to obtain experienced workers. The end of the war was timely with the company running low on raw materials and its machinery worn out, but the situation was far from hopeless as it still had its loyal staff and the means to invest in new plant and stock.

1920

“We brush the whole country”

This was a slogan that Jordan introduced at the beginning of the 1920s, and at that time the company marketers had good reason for the claim. By then Jordan brushes could be found right across the country. Even in the remotest village it was possible to buy the company’s brooms and brushes.

1927-1933

Production and marketing of toothbrushes from 1927

In a far-reaching move Jordan introduced toothbrushes to its already wide range of brush products in 1927. This was brought about by Hjalmar Jordan, the founder’s grandson and former CEO, and brought a whole new dimension to the business. It came about as a result of his widespread travels abroad where he observed the large production of toothbrushes and realized the enormous potential that this represented. From that point Hjalmar Jordan set about transforming the company in his usual purposeful and systematic way. Technically, it was a very complicated task, and the first models were only introduced after a succession of long-term experiments and favourable test results. With the product perfected, the company secured a site at Sinsen/Løren and built the country’s first toothbrush plant, with production getting underway in 1933. Soon Jordan was supplying over half of the toothbrush market in Norway. With the production equipment purchased abroad the quality of the products was considered to be almost on a par with the foreign competition.

1930

The first prosthesis brushes also came on the market in the early 1930s. At this time celluloid also began to make inroads and Jordan decided to resume production of combs.

1936

Having had great success with their toothbrushes in the domestic market in 1936 the company made its first foray into exports, establishing a commission warehouse in Sweden for toothbrushes, vulcanised brushes and some fine brushes.

1937

Centenary Year

1937 saw Jordan celebrate its 100th anniversary, and at the same time it was developing into a substantial business, producing 225,000 toothbrushes that year. Turnover in 1937 was NOK 1.3 million and the company employed 144 people.

1938

The 17th of June 1938 saw the early death of Hjalmar Jordan aged just 51 years. He was later honoured by having a road named after him in Oslo.

1940-1945

War Years

Just before the outbreak of World War II Jordan expanded production and purchased the first moulding machinery in Norway. During the war, the machine produced combs and afterwards it was used to manufacture toothbrush handles in plastic, representing a major advance in the technical capabilities of the company’s manufacturing base. The war left its mark on the business. New production equipment was unavailable and like everyone else the company had to do its best with obsolete machinery. It was also important to keep the workforce together, as the loss of key employees could create serious problems, particularly as Jordan was the only company of its kind in the country, which made it difficult to obtain experienced workers. The end of the war was timely with the company running low on raw materials and its machinery worn out, but the situation was far from hopeless as it still had its loyal staff and the means to invest in new plant and stock.